Mediterranean Diet CE in Italy

The University of Connecticut
School of Pharmacy, Department of Allied Health Sciences & Office of Global Affairs - Education Aborad

Present

The Mediterranean Diet from an Italian Perspective

“Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” – Hippocrates

Mediterranean Diet Italy

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A knowledge and application-based continuing education activity for US pharmacists and dietitians

Florence, Italy – November 8-12, 2016

Registration is CLOSED-WE ARE FULL!

Visit this site often to look for a repeat of this conference in 2017 or 2018

Subject to change (last update: November 1, 2016)

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

5:00- 7:00pm – Registration/Welcome Reception at Palazzo Rucellai

Welcome Address: Dr. Stefano Baldassarri (Director, ISI Florence)

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Morning Session 1: Historical Perspectives (Moderator Fischer) at Palazzo Bargagli

8:45-9:00 AM Introduction to the Conference

Dr. Jill Fitzgerald; Director UConn Pharmacy Professional Development and Jane Kerstetter; Professor Emeritus UConn Department of Allied Health Sciences

9:00-10:00 AM From Diaita to the Mediterranean Diet

Peter J. E. Fischer, PhD, Professor of History, International Studies Institute at Palazzo Rucellai, Florence; ISI Florence:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Discuss the historical evolution and the cultural definition of Mediterranean Diets

2. Identify the significant individuals responsible for the advances in medicine and dietary theory

3. Describe why a historical perspective is germane to medical issues today

4.  List 3 ways healthcare providers can use the historical information to empower patients to promote health

0009-0000-16-035-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

10:10-11:10 AM The Pioneers of the Mediterranean Diet. An Anthropological Journey between Past and Present

Elizabeth Moro PhD, Associate Professor of Cultural Anthropology at the University of Naples, Italy

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Explain how Ancel and Margaret Keys initially discovered the association between health and the diets of Mediterranean countries

2. Explain how the popular culture of Cilento (Salerno) influenced the nutritional model elaborated by the scientists who conducted the Seven Countries Study

3. Describe the difference between the modern Italian food culture and the original Mediterranean Diet

0009-0000-16-036-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

11:20-12:20 PM Mediterranean Diet for Health and Beyond

Francesco Sofi, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Food Science and Clinical Nutrition, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, School of Human Health Sciences, University of Florence, Italy

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1.  Describe the real association between Mediterranean dietary pattern and health status

2.  Summarize the most updated scientific literature on the beneficial aspects of Mediterranean diet versus chronic degenerative diseases and their risk factors

3.  Describe why a research perspective on restoring Mediterranean diet’s original traditions is mandatory today

0009-0000-16-034-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

Afternoon Session 1

  • 2:40 pm: Meet inside Santa Maria Novella train station under the green pharmacy cross
  • 3:00 pm: Departure by private bus
  • 3:30 pm Arrival at Castello del Trebbio in Rufina
  • 3:45 pm: Guided Tour of the estate followed by a tasting of olive, wine and other specialty products
  • 6:00 pm Departure for Florence
  • 6:30 pm Arrival in Florence at Santa Maria Novella train station

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Morning Session 2: Pharmaceutical Perspectives (Moderator Fitzgerald) at ‘Ospedale Santa Maria Nuova’ in Florence

Welcome Address: Dr. Giancarlo Landini, President Foundation Ospedale Santa Maria Nuova

9:00-10 AM Pharmacy practice: comparing Italy to US – discussion of a public health system approach

Dr. Silvia Puliti , Practicing Pharmacist (MPH) Florence

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the differences and similarities of pharmacy practice in Italy and USA
  2. Describe the differences in the role of pharmacists in the two countries
  3. Recall ways of integrating mutual experiences into everyday practice

0009-0000-16-037-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

10:10-11:10 AM Pharmaceutical care in Italy: Organization and professional practice

Dr. Giampaolo Irtinni, Pharmacist, Secretary of the Florence Pharmaceutical Council, Florence, Italy

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss the concept of pharmaceutical care in a European country with a National Health Service (NHS)
  2. Describe how the NHS is organized and regulated by the state and regional authorities
  3. Discuss which activities are permitted and prohibited to a pharmacist in his/her professional practice
  4. Describe how NHS and commercial sales affects the business of a pharmacy

0009-0000-16-038-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

11:20-12:20 PM The Galenic Preparations at the Laboratory of the Santa Maria Nuova Hospital in Florence.

Dr. Irene Ruffino, Hospital Farmacist, Ospedale Santa Maria Nuova, Florence

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1.      Recognize the importance of the discipline ‘Galenic preparations’ to suit actual clinical needs

2.      Discuss how research is set up for the preparation of new formulations for orphan dosages and active ingredients

3.      Describe the pharmacoeconomic importance of Galenic preparations

0009-0000-16-039-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

Afternoon Session 2

  • 2:00-4:00 PM Guided tour at this most ancient hospital in the world and visit of the laboratory where ancient medicines according to Galenic recipes are manufactured by Dr. Ruffino and her staff
  • 4:30-6:30 PM Visit to a working Pharmacy in the center of Florence and to the Officina Profumo-Farmaceutica di Santa Maria Novella (one of Italy’s oldest pharmacies, founded in 1385 in Florence by the Dominican Friars) in Florence

Friday, November 11, 2016

Morning Session 3:

9:00 AM -12:00 PM Exclusive Guided Tour

Exclusive Guided Tour of the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence (Residence of the Medici family) with Prof. Stefano Corrazzini and Exploration of the Mercato Centrale with Prof. Fischer (includes tastings)

Afternoon Session 3: Nutritional Perspectives (Moderator Kerstetter) at Palazzo Bargagli

2:00-3:00 PM The Mediterranean Diet and Our Health: Yesterday and Today

Jane Kerstetter, PhD, RD, Professor Emeritus, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify the historical research study methodology (interventional vs observational) that laid the initial groundwork for modern dietary recommendations

2. Recall the strengths and weaknesses of the pivotal research studies documenting the health consequences of the Mediterranean diet

3. Summarize the goals and objectives of the ongoing studies on aspects of the Mediterranean diet and our health

0009-0000-16-041-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

3:10-4:10 PM Food Patterns and Nutritional Issues of Italian Mediterranean Diet

Barbara Pampaloni, PhD, Collaborating Nutritionist at the Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi (University of Florence teaching hospital), Florence, Italy

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Identify how the Italian dietitians and nutritionists are trained in comparison to the American system

2. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the current Mediterranean diet from an Italian perspective

3. Identify the changes in the nutritional health of Italians in response to the changes in the food systems

4. Recall examples of ways Italians use food as treatment for certain diseases

0009-0000-16-042-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

4:20-5:20 PM Panel Discussion

Jane Kerstetter, PhD, RD, Professor Emeritus, Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

Elena Pizzighelli, Scholastic Food Administrator in the Public Service Office of the city of Florence Italy: Florence School Lunch; A Unique and Delicious Lunch Experience for Children

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1.  Discuss how the roots of dietary habits are instilled in Italian children

2. Recall the components of the Italian school-based lunch services in terms of food acquisition, handling, preparation, serving and costs

3. Describe the link between cultural eating habits of Italian children and the incidence of disease

4. Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the Italian school lunch program in comparison to the American programs

0009-0000-16-043-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Application-based)

Saturday, November 12, 2016

Morning Session 4: Italian Perspectives (Moderator Ascione) at Palazzo Bargagli

9:00-10:00 AM The Anthropology of Food and the Mediterranean Diet as an Intangible Human Heritage

Elisa Ascione, PhD, Anthropologist, Umbra Institute Perugia, Italy

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1.  Describe an anthropological notion of culture when considering diverse food cultures

2.  Identify the processes that led to the inscription of the Mediterranean Diet as UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

3. Describe the concept of heritage as a social, political and cultural field that can be used as a tool to revitalize local communities and promote more sustainable lifestyles

0009-0000-16-044-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

10:10-11:10 AM The Mediterranean Diet and the Italian Food Psychosis

Simon Young, PhD, Food Historian, ISI Florence, Italy

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1. Outline the history of the Mediterranean Diet in Italy in the last two hundred years

2. Describe modern Italian attitudes to the Mediterranean Diet

3. Identify American influence on Italian food perceptions

0009-0000-16-045-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

11:20-12:20 PM The Importance of an Imbalanced Diet

John E. Metcalfe, PhD, Professor of Food and Culture in Italy, Palazzo Ruccelai, Florence, Italy

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

1.  Discuss the origins of our nutritional demands versus food abundance

2.  Identify societal restrictions on food consumption and the importance of lifestyle and attitudes

3.  Describe the importance of the social aspects of food

0009-0000-16-046-L04-P (0.1 CEU or 1 contact hour) (Knowledge-based)

Afternoon Session 4

  • 3:15 pm: Meet inside Santa Maria Novella train station under the green pharmacy cross
  • 3:30 pm: Departure by private bus
  • 3:50 pm: Arrival at Antico Spedale del Bigallo in the outskirts of Florence
  • 4:00 pm: Guided Tour of the historical complex followed by a tasting of ‘Fettunta’ (toasted Tuscan bread with freshly pressed olive oil) and of Tuscan wine in front of an open fire in the ancient kitchen of the hospital
  • 5:30 pm: Aperitivo
  • 6:00 pm: Gala Dinner in the ancient refectory
  • 9:00 pm: Departure for Florence
  • 9:30 pm: Arrival in Florence at Santa Maria Novella train station

Academic Rationale

The Mediterranean diet is one of the most unique, delicious and important diets in terms of its ability to optimize our health, promote longevity, prevent disease and sustain our environment.   Scientific studies and meta-analyses unequivocally demonstrate that the Mediterranean is effective in preventing or even reversing cardiovascular disease, the number one killer in the US and Europe.  As a result, the US obesity rates are 3 times higher than Italians and our life span is 4 years shorter.

Although the foods consumed in the Mediterranean countries form quite possibly the healthiest diet in the world, what do Americans really understand about the Mediterranean diet aside from the media portrayal?  Similarly, medical professionals have a strong scientific basis for recommending the Mediterranean Diet to their clientele, but do we really understand the nuances of this diet and lifestyle?

The primary purpose of this conference is to reveal new perspectives of the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle to practicing health care providers in the US.  Most of the speakers in the conference will be Italians who will provide a unique perspective on the Mediterranean Diet; its important foods, culture, history.

During the 3 hour morning sessions, seminar topics will include a summary of the Mediterranean diet, its history, food patterns, cultural aspects and health benefits.  We will focus on important foods of the region (wine, olive oil, bread), their historical significance, nutrient composition and impact on our health.  In the afternoon, there will be guided walking tours of Florence, trips to a Tuscan winery and olive oil pressing facility, food tastings and a hands on cooking class.  Most importantly, we will have special guided tours of historic pharmacies and botanical gardens that are hidden in this beautiful Renaissance city.  We will enjoy a full emersion into the Officina Profumo-Farmaceutica di Santa Maria Novella, one of the oldest pharmacies in the world.  Founded by Dominican friars shortly after 1221, this pharmacy used medicinal herbs grown in the monastic gardens to make medications, balms and pomades for the infirmary. Currently, most of the medicinal herbs used in its products are grown locally on the hills around Florence.

The conference workshops and tours will take full advantage of the rich Mediterranean cuisine and examine first-hand the profound role food plays in community, family, ethnicity, nutrition, health, and national identity. Overall, attendees will experience the insider’s view of the real Mediterranean diet; one that is considerably different than what is portrayed in the US.

Continuing Education Units

Pharmacists:

ACPE logoThe University of Connecticut, School of Pharmacy, is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. Statements of Credit will be awarded based on full sessions attended and completed online evaluations. Pharmacists can earn 12 contact hours.

 

Dietitians:  TBD

Other Health Care Professionals:  We can provide the information (Speaker’s credentials, titles, and learning objectives) that you will need to apply for accreditation through your own professional association.

Please check periodically for updated conference details.  Alternatively, add your email address to receive updates by emailing your address to joanne.nault@uconn.edu.

Conference organizers

Peter Fischer, PhD, Professor of Food History, ISI Florence, Italy
Jane Kerstetter, PhD, RD, Professor of Dietetics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA
Jill Fitzgerald, Pharm.D. Director of Pharmacy Professional Development, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA